Find out about our current, on-going, orthopaedic research trials

Orthopaedic research trials

Trial: Investigation of balance maintenance strategies in the spine and lower limbs during postural perturbation in patients with chronic lower back pain

Research area

Musculoskeletal, biodynamics

Summary

This project is investigating the kinematics (body movements) of the spine and lower limbs during functional activities and sudden perturbations (balance disturbances).
It has been shown that individuals with a history of lower back pain exhibit different movement and balance strategies compared to individuals who have never experienced back pain. The overall goal of the study is to examine the various strategies that people use.

It is expected that several different strategies will be seen, such as trunk stiffening and specific hip movements. Better understanding of these strategies will allow for clearer insight into the various sources of pain and how these areas may be targeted in rehabilitation therapies.

Who can take part?

We have two groups of participants.

Group A

100 healthy volunteers aged between 18 to 70 years with no history of back pain and are able to stand and walk without assistance.

Group B

Lower back pain patients aged between 18 to 70 years with episodes of non-specific lower back pain at least once per month for the previous three months. Participants must still be able to stand and walk without assistance.

Study location

Paediatric research unit, St Mary’s Hospital

Contact

Janet Dean, Arthritis Research UK clinical doctoral fellow

Email: j.deane@imperial.ac.uk

 

Trial: GAFT - Gait analysis and functional testing pre- and post- anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery

Research area

Musculoskeletal

Summary

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a structure inside the knee joint that makes it more stable and can be injured or torn (ruptured) in young, athletic people.
We wish to study the effect of ACL rupture on different tests of knee function. Our aim is to develop and explore tools to help us analyse function and stability of the knee joint.

Who can take part?

Group A

Healthy participants aged between 18 and 80 years with no history of knee injury.

Group B

Participants with ACL rupture aged between 18 and 80 years.

Exclusion criteria:

  • any neurological or musculoskeletal condition involving lower limbs rheumatoid or other systemic inflammatory arthritis
  • morbid obesity (MI> 35 kg/m2)
  • patients six weeks post-surgery
    Study location

Contact

Evelyn Thangaraj, PHD student orthopaedics

Email: e.thangaraj09@imperial.ac.uk

Phone: 020 3311 7326

 


Trial: The CAPS study - an investigation of the impact of neuropathic pain and somatosensory phenotype after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery

Research area

Musculoskeletal

Summary

Carpal tunnel syndrome results from a trapped nerve in the wrist and is the most common hand disorder. It can lead to many different symptoms such as changing your sense of touch, tingling or pins and needles and might lead you to drop things. It might also be painful, disrupt sleep and may cause you to struggle with routine tasks which can lead to a change in mood and impact on your quality of life.

Many people have surgery to release the trapped nerve. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between how carpal tunnel syndrome is affecting individuals and the outcome of their carpal tunnel surgery.

Who can take part?

Adults who have been listed for elective open carpal tunnel surgery by a consultant plastic/hand surgeon where carpal tunnel syndrome was diagnosed from clinical evaluation, provocative tests and nerve conduction studies.

Contact

Miss Donna Kennedy, clinical specialist hand therapist
Email: d.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk