Find out about our current, on-going, cardiology research trials

Cardiology research trials

Trial: Ripple mapping identifying arrhythmogenic conduction channels

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

In patients who have had a heart attack the scar formed in the left ventricle (bottom chamber of the heart) consists of dead tissue mixed with strands of live tissue which form conduction channels. These strands of live tissue can cause abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) which can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, dizziness, blackouts and, in some, sudden death. The abnormal heart rhythms which can occur are called ventricular tachycardia (VT) and/or ventricular fibrillation (VF).

The purpose of this study is to test whether a new program called 'ripple mapping' can help us visualise the conduction channels formed by strands of live tissue within the scar which form the circuit for VT and cause the abnormal heart rates. Once visualised we aim to ablate (burn) these channels in the scar to see if this stops the occurrence of VT in the lab immediately afterwards but also in the longer term.

Who can take part?

Patients referred for clinically indicated VT ablation by their electrophysiologist

Contact

Email: ichc-tr.carres@nhs.net

 

Trial: The role of left atrial ganglionated plexi sites that trigger pulmonary vein ectopy in the pathogenesis of paroxsymal atrial fibrillation

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder which can significantly affect a person’s quality of life.

The main cause of this condition is abnormal electrical activity from the four veins that drain into the left atrium. Abnormal electrical activity can also be as a result of the nerves supplying the heart.

The way this condition is commonly treated is by a technique known as catheter ablation, which seeks to eliminate the abnormal sources of electrical impulses. The standard catheter ablation technique involves making a series of tiny burns within the left atrium in an attempt to disconnect the electrical activity in the four veins from the rest of the left atrium (this technique is known as “pulmonary vein isolation”).

The purpose of this study is to investigate an alternative catheter ablation technique, which involves a slightly different treatment.

Who can take part?

Adults with atrial fibrillation that needs treatment by catheter ablation

Contact

Email: ICHC-TR.CARRES@NHS.NET

 

Trial: Ablation versus antiarrhythmic therapy for reducing all hospital episodes from recurrent atrial fibrillation (AVATAR AF)

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart condition that causes an irregular and often abnormally fast heart rate. It is the most common heart rhythm disturbance and causes palpitations, breathlessness, exertional symptoms and increases the likelihood of suffering a stroke.

The most effective treatment to prevent the symptoms of AF involves destroying the abnormal heart tissue that causes the problem near the veins of the left atrium of the heart.

The procedure has been continuously developed and changed since the first description in 1999. There are steps in the procedure and the follow up for the condition that we believe are no longer relevant for modern management of patients with AF.

We have designed an approach that is based on the premise that patients undergoing an operation want a safe, effective and quick treatment that reduces their symptoms so that they do not need drugs or hospital tests and appointments.

Who can take part?

Males or females aged between 18 and 85 years with atrial fibrillation

Contact

Email: ICHC-TR.CARRES@NHS.NET

 

Trial: Arrhythmias in inherited cardiac conditions

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

This study investigates whether it is possible to predict if a person is going to get fast heart rhythms using tests that do not involve passing catheters into the heart.
We will use a novel vest which can detect the electrical conduction of the heart.

By exposing the person wearing the vest to typical situations which can trigger rhythm disturbances such as exercise and relaxation, we hope to understand the differences between people that develop heart rhythms and those that do not.

Who can take part?

Adults between 18 and 80 years who have a heart condition (Brugada Sybdrome or Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy) that is associated with rhythm problems.
Study location

Contact

Email: ICHC-TR.CARRES@NHS.NET

 

Trial: Global Clinical Study of Renal Denervation with the Symplicity Spyral™ multi-electrode renal denervation system in patients with uncontrolled hypertension on standard medical therapy – SPYRAL HTN ON MED

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

The purpose of this study is to provide additional information about a medical device intended to help treat high blood pressure (hypertension) in patients taking three blood pressure medications.

The kidneys are an important regulator of blood pressure and it is thought that in patients whose blood pressure cannot be controlled, there is increased activity in the nervous system between the brain and kidney, which results in the kidneys releasing an excessive amount of hormones that raise blood pressure. Medications alone may not be effective in controlling blood pressure. Previous research has shown that disrupting or deactivating certain nerves may decrease blood pressure in some cases.

Renal denervation is a relatively new and minimally invasive procedure that may decrease the kidneys’ release of these hormones. It involves inserting a thin steerable catheter via an artery in the groin and positioned to the renal nerves along the renal arteries supplying both kidneys. This catheter delivers radiofrequency energy along each renal artery to disrupt or deactivate the nerves. Deactivation of these nerves should decrease the kidneys’ release of hormones that raise blood pressure. In this study, a medical device catheter and generator combination called the Symplicity Spyral™ Multi-electrode Renal Denervation Catheter (Symplicity Spyral catheter) and the Symplicity G3™ Renal Denervation Radiofrequency Generator (Symplicity G3 generator) will be used.

The objective of this study is to evaluate safety and the blood pressure response after renal denervation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension on three standard blood pressure medications. These data, in conjunction with the data generated in the companion study (SPYRAL HTN-OFF MED), will help determine whether commonly used medications influence the effect of renal denervation on blood pressure.

Who can take part?

Patients between 20–80 years old with a systolic blood pressure (upper number) readings between 135 –180 mmHg and uncontrolled hypertension i.e.their blood pressure is still high even though they are on medication.

Time commitment

Approximately 3-4 visits prior to procedure followed by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 month visit (clinical or telephone consultations).

Contact

Email: imperial.Hypertension@nhs.net

 

Trial: Global Clinical Study of Renal Denervation with the Symplicity Spyral™ multi-electrode renal denervation system in patients with uncontrolled hypertension in the absence of antihypertensive medications - SPYRAL HTN-OFF MED

Research area

Cardiovascular

Summary

The purpose of this study is to provide additional information about a medical device intended to help treat high blood pressure in patients in the absence of medications for high blood pressure.

The kidneys are an important regulator of blood pressure and it is thought that in patients whose blood pressure cannot be controlled, there is increased activity in the nervous system between the brain and kidney, which results in the kidneys releasing an excessive amount of hormones that raise blood pressure. Medications alone may not be effective in controlling blood pressure. Previous research has shown that disrupting certain nerves may decrease blood pressure in some cases.

Renal denervation is a relatively new and minimally invasive procedure that may decrease the kidneys’ release of these hormones. It involves inserting a thin steerable catheter via an artery in the groin and positioned to the renal nerves along the renal arteries supplying both kidneys. This catheter delivers radiofrequency energy along each renal artery to disrupt or deactivate the nerves. Deactivation of these nerves should decrease the kidneys’ release of hormones that raise blood pressure. In this study, a medical device catheter and generator combination called the Symplicity Spyral™ Multi-electrode Renal Denervation Catheter (Symplicity Spyral catheter) and the Symplicity G3™ Renal Denervation Radiofrequency Generator (Symplicity G3 generator) will be used.

The objective of this study is to evaluate safety and blood pressure response after renal denervation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension who are not taking blood pressure medications. These data, in conjunction with the data generated in the companion study (SPYRAL HTN-ON MED), will help determine whether commonly used blood pressure medications influence the effect of renal denervation on elevated blood pressure.

Who can take part?

Patients between 20–80 years old with a systolic blood pressure (upper number) readings between 135 –180 mmHg and uncontrolled hypertension i.e.their blood pressure is still high even though they are on medication. Patients on the OFF-MED study can be on blood pressure medication, but they will need to come off the medication under consultant’s care in order to be able to take part in the study.

Time commitment

Approximately 3-4 visits prior to procedure followed by 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 12 month visit (clinical or telephone consultations).

Contact

Email: imperial.Hypertension@nhs.net