Find out about our current, on-going, cancer research trials

Cancer research trials

Trial: OvPsych II - A randomised controlled trial to evaluate the impact of psychological support intervention after chemotherapy for women with ovarian cancer

Research area

Cancer

Summary

Surgery and chemotherapy can cause significant side effects which can persist for months or years after completing treatment. There has been little research into the average severity or duration of these symptoms, or the effect that they have on overall mental and physical wellbeing.

In general, survivors of all types of cancer have poorer physical and psychological wellbeing than the rest of the population and place a higher long-term burden on healthcare resources.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of psycho-education on the physical and psychological wellbeing of women with mild, moderate and moderately severe depressive symptoms who have recently completed chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

Who can take part?

Any patient who has recently completed chemotherapy for ovarian cancer.

Contact

Sophie kathirgamanathan, clinical trials coordinator

Email: sophie.kathirgamanathan@imperial.nhs.uk 

 

Trial: AXMUS C - The axitinib-monotherapy-ultrasound in metastatic colorectal cancer trial

Research area

Cancer

Summary

Axitinib has been used in phase II and III research settings for many cancers, with an adequate safety profile. Its role in the treatment of colorectal cancer as monotherapy has yet to be defined.

The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of axitinib as a single drug treatment (monotherapy) in metastatic colorectal cancer.

The study will also investigate the potential for dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound as a novel imaging biomarker of early response.

Who can take part?

Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have failed at least two previous lines of chemotherapy.

 

Contact

Mohana Suppiahm, clinical trials coordinator medical oncology

Email: mohana.suppiah@imperial.nhs.uk

 

Trial: STREAMLINE-C - Streamlining staging of colorectal cancer with whole body MRI

Research area

Cancer

Summary

This study aims to investigate whether whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better or quicker at establishing how far newly diagnosed cancer has spread from the main tumour to other parts of the body (known as staging) than the standard tests currently used such as CT scanning and PET scanning. Cancer staging is important because doctors use this information to decide on the best treatment for patients.

Who can take part?

Adults (18 or over) with histologically proven or suspected colorectal cancer referred for staging.

Contact

Lesley Honeyfield, imaging research lead

Email: Lesley.Honeyfield@imperial.nhs.uk

 

Trial: Streamlining staging of lung cancer with whole body MRI

Research area

Cancer

Summary

This study aims to investigate whether whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is better or quicker at establishing how far newly diagnosed cancer has spread from the main tumour to other parts of the body (known as staging) than the standard tests currently used such as CT scanning and PET scanning. Cancer staging is important because doctors use this information to decide on the best treatment for patients.

Who can take part?

Adults (18 or over) with histologically proven or clinically diagnosed primary non-small cell lung cancer.

Contact

Lesley Honeyfield, imaging research lead

Email: Lesley.Honeyfield@imperial.nhs.uk